David Lake

David Lake
Partner at Lake|Flato Architects
San Antonio, TX

David Lake 

As more communities are going through redevelopment, existing historic fabrics and potential for future development are the two sides of the coin that must be looked at simultaneously.

During Master Planning: A holistic Look at building for the Past and the Future (H07), we will focus on the process of successfully transforming a deserted industrial district into a destination and a catalysts for urban revitalization. Using The Pearl Brewery redevelopment in San Antonio, Texas as a case study, the focus will be on four urban design principles:

  • Preservation and adaptive reuse of the historic building stock.
  • Strategically adding new structures within the historic fabric to generate new connections, complement existing buildings and create human scaled interstitial spaces.
  • Extend the project into the urban fabric using connectors such as roads, paths, or in this case, the Historic River Walk.
  • Planned phasing to ensure that the project at each phase can exist on its own

This session will look beyond the scope of this project and show how a well thought out and designed urban scale development can be a catalyst for densification and downtown revitalization. It starts with a master plan that has purpose. We will discuss what that means and the importance as a guiding element to the master planning efforts.

Why should you attend this session? We will present to you a variety of solutions and show what can be accomplished through thoughtful master planning. A major topic that we will address is maintaining and creating authenticity. People enjoy and gravitate towards places that are “authentic” and the success of an urban scale project could depend on its ability provide the authenticity that people desire. We want attendees of this session to learn what steps can be taken to preserve authenticity where historic fabric exists, and how new development can foster this sense of place.

Greenbuild Program Working Group member and residential sustainability advisor Pepper Smith says “As a builder I have worked on or within master plan communities. There were many times I found myself wondering why the same issues kept coming up that were never thought about during the planning stages. No one thought about these projects from start to finish in a big picture view beyond the basic entitlements. I think that this course will help us to start taking the time to look at the whole area and everything that affects it rather than constantly dealing with issues in the field that could have been prevented.”

I want attendees to hear about what an exciting experience it has been to watch a deserted part of the city transform into a major downtown destination. It has been fascinating to see, barely two years after completion of the second phase, what seems to be the entire city of San Antonio descend on The Pearl for the Saturday morning farmers market and for various public events such as the outdoor summer movie series. The project created an urban environment that didn’t exist in San Antonio before and residents are starting to rethink what is possible in their city. A downtown renaissance is now underway and this project was the catalyst.

Mr. Lake has a long-term commitment to sustainable design. Among many things he’s involved with, he is has served as the Chairman of the Texas AIA Natural Resources Committee. He was the design principal for the first LEED Gold project in Indiana. He served for five years on the San Antonio Master Plan Advisory Board, redirecting growth towards infill and neighborhood preservation. As a member of the Downtown Advisory Board, he worked to fulfill the Downtown Strategic Master Plan.

This session also features:

Jason Adam
Project Manager at Joeris General Contractors / San Antonio, TX

GEA-bannerThe Green Exhibitor Award is an optional program that rewards booths for innovation and exceptional performance. This unique program recognizes winners in three categories that we feel truly designate the best from the rest:

  • Best in Show
  • Smallest Impact
  • Most Innovative

To participate, exhibitors simply log into the Exhibitor Dashboard and visit the “Booth Greening” section to launch the application. The application consists of 10 questions relating to a booth’s features, and points are associated with each response. Exhibitors are eligible to earn between 0-20 total points depending on the level of each booth’s sustainability efforts. So go ahead, login and take a look.  You will be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is to complete this survey.

Those companies scoring 17 points or higher are entered into the pool to win one of the three Awards. Finally, our Exhibitor Advisory Working Group pours over the submissions to identify those three booths that have really gone the extra mile to ensure a smaller impact while exhibiting at Greenbuild.

The three winning booths will be recognized in a variety of ways both pre-show and onsite, including a press release, online presence at greenbuildexpo.com, and a special plaque to display in your booth at Greenbuild 2014. In addition – Best in Show wins a free 10×10 booth at Greenbuild 2015 in DC!

If you are a Greenbuild exhibitor, show us how you walk the walk by entering to win the 2014 Green Exhibitor Award. Your unique sustainability practices and innovative exhibition operations could earn your company some serious recognition among our community of industry leaders. A very small portion of your time can end up providing you with some great benefits!

Applications are due September 17. Good Luck!

Associate Principal at Buro Happold in NYC, and chocolate chip cookie connoisseur

Ariella Maron
Associate Principal at Buro Happold in NYC, and chocolate chip cookie connoisseur

Ariella Maron

Post-Sandy we have entered a new planning paradigm for which resilience must be a principal of neighborhood and infrastructure planning. This applies not only to coastal communities, but to any vulnerable to the impacts of extreme weather, infrastructure disruptions, and other disruptive events.

For this session, NYC and NOLA: Enhancing the Resiliency of the Built Environment (B09), we have brought together planning experts from New York and New Orleans to provide real insights into what it means to enhance resilience in urban areas. This is not a high level talk trying to define resilience and extol its principles; this is a discussion from professionals who are actually responsible for implementing policies and projects.  Gregg Woodruff, Senior Project Manager and Sustainability Leader for Langan Engineering and Greenbuild Program Working Group Member says “There are two interesting and exciting aspects of this session.  First, I think it is extremely interesting to have representatives from both New Orleans and New York City addressing issues of sustainability from each of their perspectives.  Second, the level of speaker involved in this session is extremely knowledgeable.”

Why am I presenting this session? I am fortunate to have the opportunity to work with many experts on the topics of coastal resilience, community planning, disaster preparedness, clean distributed energy technologies, building science, and more. I am an urban planner who seeks to improve the built environment of cities; this includes the integration of designs, technologies, planning processes, and education into the fabric of urban spaces.  I was part of the team that wrote the original PlaNYC, New York City’s sustainability plan (including the climate adaptation/resilience chapter).    I then had the opportunity to develop and oversee the City’s strategy to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2017.

So let’s get together and discuss which policies and programs are working, which are not, and why. That’s what Greenbuild is about!

This session also features:

Michael Marrella

Director and Waterfront and Open Space Planning at the NYC Department of City Planning

Jeffrey Hebert

Executive Director at New Orleans Redevelopment Authority

Julia Hughes is Architect at Chair, AIA AAJ Sustainable Justice

Julia Hughes is Architect at Chair, AIA AAJ Sustainable Justice

Julia Hughes

As the leading group of architects and planners who design facilities for the criminal justice system, we wondered if today’s justice system is socially sustainable, and if not, how can we get there? Our session will introduce an innovative and unique piece of work that has begun to look at finding answers to those questions.

At this year’s Greenbuild, we’re going to present a set of social sustainability guidelines developed by the Sustainable Justice (SJ) Committee of the AIA Academy of Architects for Justice, a multi-scalar analytical and planning tool that looks at the system functions at various levels. We’ll also talk about the social sustainability guidelines through case study presentations of real, completed buildings.

Raphael Sperry is President at Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility

Raphael Sperry is President at Architects/Designers/ Planners for Social Responsibility

We developed a model of assessing social sustainability that is both idealistic and applied, and fairly advanced for the field based on what we’ve seen. So people who want to know what’s on the cutting edge should attend this session. This session is also a chance for everyone to reflect on how LEED, augmented with a unique approach to sustainability can help their communities capitalize on the human potential of all citizens. According to Miranda Gardiner, Senior Sustainability Specialist at Stantec and Greenbuild Program Working Group member, “Sessions like this (Session A13) will inform us and help redirect efforts to missed opportunities in our sustainable mission. Striving for holistic approaches to all types of buildings, we can impact behavior that will ultimately lead to better lifestyles for everyone.”

Raphael Sperry and I are really looking forward to presenting on this topic. We both have years of experience in this area of learning that we think can benefit the attendee. We were both the lead co-authors and coordinators of an AIA committee that drafted the sustainable justice guidelines over the past three years. I became passionate about these projects while doing facility work for troubled youth, which brought purpose to my project approach and the drive to advocate for the human potential in all people, especially our community’s kids. Raphael is a green building specialist who has championed sustainability strategies for a wide variety of institutional projects, including more than a dozen LEED Gold and three LEED Platinum projects. He is an outspoken advocate on the role of architecture in social justice issues and President of the non-profit Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR).

We hope that sharing this work will help inspire and advance work in other fields, and we hope that participants can help push our advocacy further as well!

Julia Hughes is working toward several exciting SJ endeavors including the development of a TEDx series and a documentary that will highlight the advocacy and our society’s journey toward a new future of restorative justice. Raphael Sperry will be teaching what he believes is the country’s first course on architecture and human rights in San Francisco this fall, and is writing a book on the topic.

 

Jenny Rushmore is Director of Responsible Travel with Trip Advisor, the world’s largest travel website. She also runs two sewing blogs with over 50,000 readers a month!

Presenter, Jenny Rushmore, is Director of Responsible Travel with Trip Advisor, the world’s largest travel website. She also runs two sewing blogs with over 50,000 readers a month!

Jenny Rushmore

Sustainability is increasingly important to organizations, stakeholders and the public, and expectations are rising. Companies need to be able to talk about what they’re doing to meet their environmental responsibilities in a way that’s compelling and meaningful.

Setting up the TripAdvisor GreenLeaders program, the largest green hotel program in the world, has allowed me to hear and learn about the depth and breadth of green practices currently being implemented by hotels around the world who are excited to share their ideas – from hotels that are trying to help with colony collapse disorder by having beehives on the roof, to those that grow all their own food on site.

During Tools & Tips to Tell Your Story (A11) we will discuss how organizations can promote their sustainability practices to stakeholders and the public, building both their business and reputation. This session will include leaders in sustainability marketing from multiple industries, and will offer you useful information on how to make practical improvements to your organization.

According to Grace Carlson, President of Carlson Studio Marketing and Greenbuild Program Working Group Member, “Greenbuild attendees should attend this session because we all need to be telling the story of the value of sustainability more effectively – not just marketing professionals. Inspiring and reaching your most qualified prospects is essential to making the business case for green in the first place.”

Other presenters for this dynamic session include:

Taryn M. Holowka, LEED AP – VP, Marketing & Communications, U.S. Green Building Council

Ron Reeves, Jr. – Public Relations & Social Strategist, Herman Miller, Inc.

Katie Weeks, LEED Green Associate – Director of Communications, Institute for Market Transformation

Learn more about the great education offered at this year’s Greenbuild in New Orleans.