Liz York, Senior Advisor for Buildings and Facilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

“I am proud to be a part of bringing health into the sustainable buildings conversation,” says Liz York, who became an architect because she wanted to have a positive effect on people’s lives through her design.

She says, “A design that is good for one part of the system while ignoring other parts of the system, is not serving the public or the client as it should…it takes constant and deliberate action to see the design problem statement from many different perspectives.”

Collaboration, balance, and integration are common themes in York’s perspective. “We must understand the balance between recycled content, healthy materials and manufacturing costs in order to make choices that support ecology, equity, and economy simultaneously.”

Embracing the Circular Economy

Among York’s mentors and inspiration was Ray Anderson. She notes that he came from an industry that seemingly wasn’t paying attention to ecology but then took the challenge on. She also admires the work of  Ellen Dunham-Jones, who is “cataloging and re-imagining how we breathe new life into real estate as a whole when retail malls are no longer needed and other building types are in decline.” York believes that visionaries like them are “looking at their place in the larger system of building design and finding ways to create value by evoking the wisdom of the circular economy.”

In addition to industry leaders, York credit her children with inspiring her. “They are full of excitement about innovations that I may never see in my lifetime and they inspire me to consider opportunities that are blind spots for me.”

Speaking of future generations, York advises newcomers to green building to “Think about what you can personally contribute and how you are uniquely positioned with your knowledge, skills, and passions. Build partnerships with others who have similar or complementary goals and charge forward together. Think about a whole systems approach and work together to develop win-win-win solutions.”

Interested in being profiled in our Voices of Greenbuild series? Please contact us!

Atlanta has been called “a dark horse of sustainability.” A mere three years ago it was selected from among 1,000 submissions to be part of the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities initiative. In 2018 alone, more than 11 million gross square feet of space achieved LEED certification in the state of Georgia. Now, Atlanta not only has its own strategy for sustainability but has been chosen as the 2019 site for Greenbuild International Conference & Expo 2019.

Atlanta’s  goal of powering the city with 100 percent clean energy by 2035 is ambitious, and the businesses and developers in the city (which is expected to grow from 6M to 8M people by 2040) are up for the challenge. To help that effort along, more than 10K sustainability professionals will be converging in the city this fall at Greenbuild 2019 to share ideas, inspiration, and new solutions.

 

Here’s what you can expect to find in Atlanta in November:

It Begins at the Airport

More than 103 million people pass through the airport each year. From its own solar production facility to LED runway lights to its Sustainable Food Court Initiative, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport(R) is soaring in its efforts to maintain a more sustainable environment. Among the first international airports to engage in an initiative like this, it uses specialized software to manage utility performance for all its assets.

It was, in fact, the first airport in the world to earn pre-certification under the LEED for Communities program, which tracks energy, water, waste, transportation, and the human experience, including education, prosperity, equability, and health and safety. As we noted in the first part of the series, health (both individual and community) is playing a bigger role in the definition of sustainability — this year and beyond.

Welcome to One of the Greenest Cities in America

Atlanta is now in its fifth year of the Better Buildings Challenge, and is reporting impressive results — both in terms of progress in energy-efficiency and the economic health of its population.

Fast Green Fact: Atlanta is in the top 20 in the Locavore Index for its commitment to healthy food.

The Atlanta Mayor’s office has outlined nine key projects as part of the city’s ongoing sustainability commitment. The Office of Resilience commits that “through action-oriented policies, Atlanta continues to update its city infrastructure to align with these values and become a region that works for its residents, as well as a model for cities globally.”

Atlanta is home to many corporate headquarters. Home Depot, one of Greenbuild’s sponsors, has made a company-wide commitment to sustainability. Coca-Cola, Delta Air Lines, Invesco, and Newell Rubbermaid have all also been heralded for their commitment to a better planet.

Part of the national Target Cities program, Atlanta’s Eco-District has made a commitment to educating its midtown community about sustainable living practices. These new models of urban development and certification process are intended to “spark a movement of urbanists committed to using a governance and performance framework for district and neighborhood-scale redevelopment.”

Fast Green Fact: Georgia Tech offers a fully-integrated Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS)  curriculum and the state’s first Master’s program in Sustainability

Touchdown! Football season has begun, which reminds us of “the most sustainable Super Bowl ever.” Atlanta’s Mercedes Benz Stadium was the first professional sports stadium in the world to earn LEED Platinum Certification, scoring an impressive 88 points. The Green Sports Alliance declared that this Atlanta-based icon and its practices “brings sustainability to the forefront of sports.“  

Fast Green Fact: Serenbe, an experimental green community outside of Atlanta, has been thriving for more than 15 years and is home to 600 residents

The Event

The organizers of Greenbuild made a firm commitment to “walking the talk” when bringing a conference of this magnitude to a new city. The Georgia World Congress Center (GWCC) earned its LEED Gold Certification. This 4 million square foot facility tackled a variety of challenges and has become a model for convention centers nationally. We work closely with the U.S. Green Building Council and its Georgia chapter to engage the local business community in the event, along with national game-changers and leaders.  Last year, 66 percent of event attendees made at least one pledge about their own role in making the Expo itself more sustainable. An impressive 28,000 pledges were made.

Greenbuild organizers set goals for various aspects of conference production — from transportation to and from the convention center, to display production, to the handling of waste and food. Following last year’s event in Chicago, the organizers issued a comprehensive Sustainability Report, measuring every aspect of Greenbuild. Because this annual event is, in effect, its own community, Informa (the organizers) hold themselves to high standards, as if they were a city-within-a-city. The 2018 KPIs will be the stats to beat as we head into 2019.

Atlanta Welcomes You

From a global perspective to local community game-changers, Greenbuild 2019 will give sustainability professionals insights into our industry from a variety of perspectives. You’ll discover why Atlanta is rapidly becoming the epicenter of sustainable innovation in the South.

Greenbuild continues to prioritize sustainability and demonstrate leadership when it comes to greening the conference and events industry. This year’s conference will take place November 20-22 in Atlanta, GA. Registration is now open. Get your tickets here.

George Bandy, Jr., Global Leader for CSR and Sustainability, has a passion for the environment that dates back to his early youth. He was inspired by his grandmother, who “taught the discipline of being in touch with nature.”

Bandy’s inquisitiveness prompted him to study and minor in environmental business as an undergrad.

In the 1980s Bandy met Paul Hawken, environmentalist and author. Bandy was so inspired by the meeting, he went on to immerse himself in The Natural Step and ultimately became the first Sustainability Officer at the University of Texas at Houston, during a time when that position was first emerging.

In the years since then, sustainability in the business world has been trying to “earn its justification.” But he sees a massive shift over that time from evaluation of products and measurement of energy saving to environmental impacts on health and wellness — worker productivity, and the health of people inside spaces — not just building methods and materials. “People are looking more closely at the social impacts of sustainability.”

Bandy also believes that customers — both consumer and business-to-business are demanding more from the people they work with and ask different questions. “Their knowledge level is immense,” he says.

“How you treat your employees and how you engage with communities is as important as the products you make.”

Last year, Bandy was the recipient of the prestigious Leadership Award by the U.S. Green Building Council (USCBC). Mohawk continues to make a significant commitment to the health and wellness of its workers and community.

Communication is also a key part of sustainability, believes Bandy. “Evolving an organization to one that is truly committed, you need to learn to speak multiple languages. If you’re selling to a CFO, for example, you need to connect sustainability to long-term cost savings or the stock price.”

Bandy believes that ultimately we need to make sustainability more relevant and personal to consumers, business decision-makers, and employees. “People will learn better, perform better, and help their company thrive if their environments are healthier.”

Interested in being profiled in our Voices of Greenbuild series? Please contact us!

We are excited to offer our valued Greenbuild social media community a chance to enter to win a free 4-day Greenbuild 2019 conference pass, PLUS a free ticket to Greenbuild Celebration featuring Collective Soul!

Greenbuild is the largest annual event for green building professionals worldwide to learn and source cutting edge solutions to improve resilience, sustainability, and quality of life in our buildings, cities, and communities. It’s where inspiration ignites, relationships cultivate, knowledge transfers and the leaders developing the next generation of standards, policies, and partnerships gather to turn the promise of a higher living standard into a reality for all.

How to Enter:

  • Use hashtag #WhyIGreenbuild in a tweet, Facebook post, Instagram post, or LinkedIn post sharing a 60-second video explaining what green building means to you. For example, share what motivated you to get into the green building or sustainability industry, your mission, or what you hope to see for the future of the industry.
  • Post your video with the hashtag #WhyIGreenbuild. We will watch all of the videos and choose one winner per week leading up to the conference. Winners to announced October 31, 2019 on the Greenbuild social media channels.

Your Prize:

  • 1 4-day Greenbuild International Conference and Expo conference pass and 1 ticket to Greenbuild Celebration! A total value of $1,500.

Contest Rules:

  • The contest is live until Thursday, October 31, 2019.
  • Please mention #WhyIGreenbuild and #Greenbuild19 in your submission. We can only see posts that are tagged!
  • You must follow @Greenbuild on the social media platform that you are posting to in order to be considered.
  • Multiple entries in a single day will not be accepted. Posting duplicate, or near duplicate, updates or links is a violation of the Twitter Rules and jeopardizes search quality.
  • Do not create multiple accounts to post the same submission to the contest more than once. Anyone found to use multiple accounts to enter will be ineligible.
  • You are responsible for any and all travel expenses.
  • Video submissions may be used in Greenbuild marketing.

Watch a short video by our friend Mahesh Ramanujam, CEO of U.S. Greenbuilding Council for some of your own inspiration:

The future of the human race is interlaced with the future of the planet, and the sustainable practices we celebrate and advance at Greenbuild remind us that our success as sustainability advocates, practitioners and professionals is more than a movement, it is a responsibility.

Good luck!

Cheers,

The #Greenbuild19 Team

www.greenbuildexpo.com

As we prepare for Greenbuild International Conference & Expo 2019, we can’t help but reflect on how our industry has changed.

Sustainable building and development has evolved from what was once viewed as a fad to a global imperative, with an impact on health and wellness as well as the economic growth of communities, cities, our country, and ultimately our planet.

Engaging buyers and influencers of green building solutions involves relationship cultivation and trust.

Download our whitepaper to master the strategies behind sustainable design, building, and construction.

David Lake

David Lake
Partner at Lake|Flato Architects
San Antonio, TX

David Lake 

As more communities are going through redevelopment, existing historic fabrics and potential for future development are the two sides of the coin that must be looked at simultaneously.

During Master Planning: A holistic Look at building for the Past and the Future (H07), we will focus on the process of successfully transforming a deserted industrial district into a destination and a catalysts for urban revitalization. Using The Pearl Brewery redevelopment in San Antonio, Texas as a case study, the focus will be on four urban design principles:

  • Preservation and adaptive reuse of the historic building stock.
  • Strategically adding new structures within the historic fabric to generate new connections, complement existing buildings and create human scaled interstitial spaces.
  • Extend the project into the urban fabric using connectors such as roads, paths, or in this case, the Historic River Walk.
  • Planned phasing to ensure that the project at each phase can exist on its own

This session will look beyond the scope of this project and show how a well thought out and designed urban scale development can be a catalyst for densification and downtown revitalization. It starts with a master plan that has purpose. We will discuss what that means and the importance as a guiding element to the master planning efforts.

Why should you attend this session? We will present to you a variety of solutions and show what can be accomplished through thoughtful master planning. A major topic that we will address is maintaining and creating authenticity. People enjoy and gravitate towards places that are “authentic” and the success of an urban scale project could depend on its ability provide the authenticity that people desire. We want attendees of this session to learn what steps can be taken to preserve authenticity where historic fabric exists, and how new development can foster this sense of place.

Greenbuild Program Working Group member and residential sustainability advisor Pepper Smith says “As a builder I have worked on or within master plan communities. There were many times I found myself wondering why the same issues kept coming up that were never thought about during the planning stages. No one thought about these projects from start to finish in a big picture view beyond the basic entitlements. I think that this course will help us to start taking the time to look at the whole area and everything that affects it rather than constantly dealing with issues in the field that could have been prevented.”

I want attendees to hear about what an exciting experience it has been to watch a deserted part of the city transform into a major downtown destination. It has been fascinating to see, barely two years after completion of the second phase, what seems to be the entire city of San Antonio descend on The Pearl for the Saturday morning farmers market and for various public events such as the outdoor summer movie series. The project created an urban environment that didn’t exist in San Antonio before and residents are starting to rethink what is possible in their city. A downtown renaissance is now underway and this project was the catalyst.

Mr. Lake has a long-term commitment to sustainable design. Among many things he’s involved with, he is has served as the Chairman of the Texas AIA Natural Resources Committee. He was the design principal for the first LEED Gold project in Indiana. He served for five years on the San Antonio Master Plan Advisory Board, redirecting growth towards infill and neighborhood preservation. As a member of the Downtown Advisory Board, he worked to fulfill the Downtown Strategic Master Plan.

This session also features:

Jason Adam
Project Manager at Joeris General Contractors / San Antonio, TX

Associate Principal at Buro Happold in NYC, and chocolate chip cookie connoisseur

Ariella Maron
Associate Principal at Buro Happold in NYC, and chocolate chip cookie connoisseur

Ariella Maron

Post-Sandy we have entered a new planning paradigm for which resilience must be a principal of neighborhood and infrastructure planning. This applies not only to coastal communities, but to any vulnerable to the impacts of extreme weather, infrastructure disruptions, and other disruptive events.

For this session, NYC and NOLA: Enhancing the Resiliency of the Built Environment (B09), we have brought together planning experts from New York and New Orleans to provide real insights into what it means to enhance resilience in urban areas. This is not a high level talk trying to define resilience and extol its principles; this is a discussion from professionals who are actually responsible for implementing policies and projects.  Gregg Woodruff, Senior Project Manager and Sustainability Leader for Langan Engineering and Greenbuild Program Working Group Member says “There are two interesting and exciting aspects of this session.  First, I think it is extremely interesting to have representatives from both New Orleans and New York City addressing issues of sustainability from each of their perspectives.  Second, the level of speaker involved in this session is extremely knowledgeable.”

Why am I presenting this session? I am fortunate to have the opportunity to work with many experts on the topics of coastal resilience, community planning, disaster preparedness, clean distributed energy technologies, building science, and more. I am an urban planner who seeks to improve the built environment of cities; this includes the integration of designs, technologies, planning processes, and education into the fabric of urban spaces.  I was part of the team that wrote the original PlaNYC, New York City’s sustainability plan (including the climate adaptation/resilience chapter).    I then had the opportunity to develop and oversee the City’s strategy to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2017.

So let’s get together and discuss which policies and programs are working, which are not, and why. That’s what Greenbuild is about!

This session also features:

Michael Marrella

Director and Waterfront and Open Space Planning at the NYC Department of City Planning

Jeffrey Hebert

Executive Director at New Orleans Redevelopment Authority

Julia Hughes is Architect at Chair, AIA AAJ Sustainable Justice

Julia Hughes is Architect at Chair, AIA AAJ Sustainable Justice

Julia Hughes

As the leading group of architects and planners who design facilities for the criminal justice system, we wondered if today’s justice system is socially sustainable, and if not, how can we get there? Our session will introduce an innovative and unique piece of work that has begun to look at finding answers to those questions.

At this year’s Greenbuild, we’re going to present a set of social sustainability guidelines developed by the Sustainable Justice (SJ) Committee of the AIA Academy of Architects for Justice, a multi-scalar analytical and planning tool that looks at the system functions at various levels. We’ll also talk about the social sustainability guidelines through case study presentations of real, completed buildings.

Raphael Sperry is President at Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility

Raphael Sperry is President at Architects/Designers/ Planners for Social Responsibility

We developed a model of assessing social sustainability that is both idealistic and applied, and fairly advanced for the field based on what we’ve seen. So people who want to know what’s on the cutting edge should attend this session. This session is also a chance for everyone to reflect on how LEED, augmented with a unique approach to sustainability can help their communities capitalize on the human potential of all citizens. According to Miranda Gardiner, Senior Sustainability Specialist at Stantec and Greenbuild Program Working Group member, “Sessions like this (Session A13) will inform us and help redirect efforts to missed opportunities in our sustainable mission. Striving for holistic approaches to all types of buildings, we can impact behavior that will ultimately lead to better lifestyles for everyone.”

Raphael Sperry and I are really looking forward to presenting on this topic. We both have years of experience in this area of learning that we think can benefit the attendee. We were both the lead co-authors and coordinators of an AIA committee that drafted the sustainable justice guidelines over the past three years. I became passionate about these projects while doing facility work for troubled youth, which brought purpose to my project approach and the drive to advocate for the human potential in all people, especially our community’s kids. Raphael is a green building specialist who has championed sustainability strategies for a wide variety of institutional projects, including more than a dozen LEED Gold and three LEED Platinum projects. He is an outspoken advocate on the role of architecture in social justice issues and President of the non-profit Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR).

We hope that sharing this work will help inspire and advance work in other fields, and we hope that participants can help push our advocacy further as well!

Julia Hughes is working toward several exciting SJ endeavors including the development of a TEDx series and a documentary that will highlight the advocacy and our society’s journey toward a new future of restorative justice. Raphael Sperry will be teaching what he believes is the country’s first course on architecture and human rights in San Francisco this fall, and is writing a book on the topic.

 

Exhibit at Greenbuild

Exhibit at Greenbuild

For the last seven years, my company, Bradley Corporation has been a loyal exhibitor at the Greenbuild International Conference and Expo.

Greenbuild is the best expo because it provides a platform for Bradley to showcase our water conservation products among the industry’s newest manufacturing innovations, recycled materials, and award-winning product designs.

Greenbuild attendees are awesome. They are highly engaged in the sustainable building industry, and they are well informed. So for us, Greenbuild is a fantastic way to get in front of the people that believe in green and sustainable building and show them that Bradley has the products they need for their next project.

This year we are expecting that Greenbuild will convene 23,000 attendees and 750 exhibitors. It goes without saying that the Greenbuild Expo provides unlimited opportunities to find new business leads and showcase innovative products.

Are you interested in exhibiting? Learn more.